Palm Beach Resident Receives Ending Homelessness Award

Categories: In the News

For more than 15 years, Pamela McIver of Palm Beach has volunteered at The Lord’s Place, a nonprofit, organization in West Palm Beach dedicated to breaking the cycle of homelessness.

While McIver sits on the board of directors as chairwoman of the advancement committee, it’s never been about titles to her. “I’ve never been involved to get awards or recognition. What’s always stood out to me is the clients and their thank-yous,” she said.

It’s that dedication to the cause that made McIver “the perfect recipient” and the “epitome” of the 2017 Ending Homelessness Award, according to Diana Stanley, chief executive officer of The Lord’s Place.

“Pam is the kind of person that you’ll see at our Thanksgiving dinner, sitting and eating turkey with our clients,” said Stanley. “Anyone can write a check or sit on a board, but Pam does more than that. That’s what makes her so wonderful.”

McIver, who received the award at a Nov. 16th breakfast at the Kravis Center, started volunteering in 2000 as a lunchtime table companion who helped clients with their resumes after finding the opportunity in The Palm Beach Post. She decided to give it a try even though she had no connections to homelessness or ever been involved with a charity. McIver just felt there “had to be more” to her everyday life.

“I think being here in Palm Beach, we are so fortunate. We are surrounded by some of the most elegant homes and beautiful beaches, but 15 or 20 minutes over that bridge, it’s a different world for some,” McIver said. “Being involved with The Lord’s Place gives me a useful balance and it’s personally a constant reminder to count your blessings.”

Since her days of sitting with clients and editing their resumes, McIver has taken on bigger roles and projects. She helped create the SleepOut event, where members from the organization and community simulate being homeless for a night, and the Tomorrow Fund, which raises money for Lord’s Place children to go to summer camp.

Now, after 17 years, McIver said she doesn’t think she’ll stop until the “day we end homelessness.”